Summertime

Summer is here 🙂 And I am tentatively optimistic about the season so far. The first garlic-cropmaincrop of the season, the garlic, has been harvested. And its a whopper, definately the best yield we’ve had from our 5kg plantings yet. We’ve sold 10kg ‘wet’ so far, and there must be at least another 50kgs drying in the polytunnel.

broccoli for web
Purple sprouting broccoli.

We’ve had some seriously hot weather and droughts though, which resulted in the 60m of brassica salads bolting 😦  But the hundreds of kale and broccoli’s have survived, and we have been selling them. They are slightly drowning in Phacelia flowers, but I am also selling the flowers too.

The 40m of carrots are coming along well. But sowing 8 rows in a 1m bed has not worked. This is Joy Larkcom’s ‘How to Grow Vegetables’ advice, as the dense planting is supposed to crowd out weeds. Well, days and days of finger weeding, say this doesn’t work on our soil. Weeds flourish and there’s no space for my hoe. If (and I mean if) I grow carrots again I will revert to four rows, with twine down them so you can see where you sowed, and space to hoe.

I started selling from the first 60m sowing of beetroots. The seeds used to fill in the gaps in germination have germinated too, so there should be a good succession too. They look and taste fantastic. Last week I sowed another 60m of purple beetroot and 60m of chioggia (pink/white) too.

The broad beans are almost ready, and we’ll be harvesting at the weekend. Not even had a taste yet myself.

The first shallots were harvested last weekend for the veg boxes. They are delicious, and should easily cover the high cost (£24) of the sets.

The 100 white onion plantlets and 100 Red Baron plantlets are doing ok. There has probably been a 30% loss, with the trauma of being posted (see early crops), then planted, but this is within acceptable parameters.

frenchbeans
French bean seedlings

The French beans are germinating and all their netting is up ready. There are some Fat hen weeds coming close to them too, so if it is nice tomorrow, we will be hoeing them. The Mange touts did not germinate well, so I have ordered some Runner beans to sow instead.

The 40 tomato plants are doing ok. I tasted the first tomato a few days ago, so hopefully many more will follow. The yellow cherry ‘Mil de Fluer‘ variety is living up to its name, with more flowers on a vine than I have ever seen. I have had to use crates to keep the low ones off the floor, so should probably have nipped this first vine out.

The cucumbers are all planted out in the polytunnel, and the first gorgeous yellow flowers are appearing. I have tied up some of them, and pruned out their side shoots. But due to the heat this has been tricky. Rain is due tomorrow, so will get on with sorting supports for the remaining cucumbers.

The squash and courgettes have been planted out through the plastic. Some were lost to slugs, but most have survived. I have a few more still to go out. I may also sow more, which I may just about get away with, while its raining tomorrow.

I have ordered 144 leek and 144 lettuce transplants for planting out, as my sowings with these crops were not very successful. Well, you can’t win them all. Hopefully we find time and breaks in the rain to get these planted out when they arrive.

 

Early crops

This is one of the easier weather starts to the season that we’ve seen in the last few years. We have 40m of rocket and 20m of red mizuna planted. It is ready for harvesting now, and will be on the stall at Levy Market and in the veg boxes this Sunday.

We have planted out 200 kale and 200 purple sprouting broccoli. They are protected from pigeons by mesh, fleece or netting. They seem to be doing well.

We have two 1x20m beds of carrots, and they have just germinated. We have had to spend  many hours finger weeding the weeds, as they are very susceptible to weed competition at this early stage. We have sown 8 rows in each bed, so are hoping once they are bigger, they will crowd out the weeds. More established market gardens would use a flame weeder.  20170524_180338

The 60m of early beetroots have germinated, and are looking healthy now. I went down the rows, and sowed extra seeds in the gaps yesterday, as it is quite patchy germination.

The broad beans have germinated, and we have taken down the bird netting and old CDs that were protecting them. We use this because birds pull them out thinking the little shoot is a worm. Myself and George have spent a good amount of time digging out couch between the plants, so this isn’t exactly a crop success, they would have been better in a section with better control of couch. But weirdly we have found this digging quite satisfying.

I have done a trial of shallots, and bought 2.5kg in sets, at a staggering £24 (they have to be organically certified). It felt quite futile, and a waste of money, but they seem to be doing ok now. They have about 10 shoots coming off each one, so should produce 10 small shallots. I did check Joy Larkcom’s bible ‘Grow Your Own Vegetables,’ and apparently if you want larger shallots you should thin to 6 shoots. But I think I have left it too late for this, so small ones we will have.

crop
Bare rooted onion plantlets

We have also planted out 100 white onion plantlets and 100 Red Baron plantlets. I ordered these bare rooted from Tamar in the Winter, and they arrive beginning of May. When they arrive there is a million other things to do in the garden, and they arrive live, wrapped in wet newspaper and will promptly die if you don’t get them planted asap. I did trench them in some pots of compost to buy myself a few days, and then got them planted out in there permanent beds as thankfully a very large group of volunteers had been scheduled in that week. They are still alive weeks later, and hopefully will start growing vigorously soon.

The 40 tomatoes are planted out in the tunnel. They were not growing so much in April and early May. But in the last couple of weeks, as the temperature has increased and the days have lengthened, they have shot on.

Most of the cucumbers have germinated, and some that have their first true leaves, were 20170524_180237planted out yesterday in the tunnel. The rest will be planted out, when we get round to rotavating in the muck in the rest of the tunnel (which will be soon!) We have traditionally lost alot of these sowing to mice who eat the seeds before they germinate. But we have trialed placing crates with there handle holes taped over, on top of the seeds. When the seed germinates it is then moved from under the crate where it is darker than in the rest of the tunnel. It has had a 100% success rate, and is nicer than using mouse traps, which we have tried in past years.

The courgettes and squashes have all been sowed, and in the same way placed under the crates. The ones that have germinated are being kept outside now, as its very hot in the tunnel, and nighttime temperatures aren’t going to be below freezing now. Next big jobs are getting the beds ready for french bean sowing, and sowing more carrots and beetroots.

Winter jobs

The Winter is definitely slower, as there is no work on the land, veg boxes or markets. But there are so many important indoor jobs that need doing.

Tax return
One of them is making sense of the financial spreadsheets, which need reconciling with the bank account. Whilst wrestling with it over Xmas, I pondered streamlining it. I decided to go onto the cash basis for the upcoming year. Also to scrap recording financial data on how much veg was ours and how much was bought in, as our it’s already recorded in yields for our organic license. And to investigate buying some accounting software….

Soil Association records
For our organic license, I have to record every seed sown or plug plant transplanted. I also have to record what inputs (manures, composts etc) I have used. I also have to record the yield from each crop (eg. leeks 203kg). I also have to do a plan for the year ahead, showing that I am rotating crops. I keep my own breakdown of where these yields were sold (market, veg boxes or wholesale) and how much income they generated. We are then audited annually by the Soil Association.

Analysing the figures
I add this info to graphs showing how much of our veg we’ve sold, and how much bought in veg, and how much overall. This means I can compare it easily with data from previous years. I have a separate graph for Levy market, and another one for the veg boxes. I also make a table showing at a glance the yield and income from each crop, which enables me to see which are the most and least profitable. Top three are: rocket, salad and tomatoes. Bottom three are: parsnips, chillies and courgettes. Parsnips and chillies have been relegated.

seeds for website

seeds&cat4web
At least the cats interested!

The season ahead
One of my favourite jobs is planning for the upcoming growing season. I plan the rotation, and the different crops within it. So, for the allium rotation, previously we have concentrated on garlic and leeks. But this year we are branching out into doing some shallots and onions too. For brassicas, we are continuing to do rocket, mizunas and kale, but also trying some purple sprouting broccoli too.
I input all this data into a spreadsheet I am tinkering with, to try and show me how much yield and income I can expect from the crops. It is a work in progress as I am still figuring out the yield calculation. Then I put the seed and plant order in, they all need to be organically certified.

Marketing
I put together a brief for a logo, banner for the Reddy-Lane-A6-flyerresize4webmarket and flyers months ago. Over Winter I finally found the right designer, and after 10 amendments we got to a logo that I am really happy with. Thankfully for the designer, the banner and flyers were pretty much right first time. I ordered 2000 flyers, that were ready just in time for the first market.

Steering group
I also put together a steering group of four people with relevant skills to Reddy Lane. I hope that this will enable planning ahead for risks, and better strategic thinking. And may even translate into actual help out on the field. We have had our first meeting, and a lovely tea of lentil and sweet potato mash.

And now, back to the garden, it is Spring afterall….

Reddy-Lane-banner-FINAL-resize4web
The new banner for Levy market